Anyone that has been in the Northland for those "transitional seasons" (spring and fall) knows that fog off Lake Superior is just part of the game.

We've seen a good handful of days and/or nights now, where the Twin Ports area and elsewhere near Lake Superior sees some fog. At times, just getting "above the hill" and away from the lake a bit will allow you to escape the seasonal gloom of the fog, but there have been some evenings where that fog expands inland quite a bit more, making for more difficult driving conditions. Add the ever-present threat of deer on the roads, and it can make for some tense drives to get to your destination.

I had to make a late-evening drive down toward Moose Lake last night, and the fog from just atop the hill near Spirit Mountain all the way to my destination and back was super thick. The video I snagged from NOAA's GOES East satellite shows that plume of fog pushing in from the head of Lake Superior well inland like someone exhaling on a cold January night.

Similarly, the Duluth office of the National Weather Service shared a different view of the fog from a couple nights ago. Using a different view from the GOES East satellite, the showed the expansion of fog in from Lake Superior around both the North Shore and South Shore on Tuesday night.

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Fog is likely to linger and come & go through the coming days. With that being the case, make sure you're doing all you can to stay safe if you're on the road when visibility is low from the fog.

The biggest tips to keep in mind when it is foggy are:

  • Reduce speed
  • Use your low beams (even during the daytime - that way others can see you)
  • keep extra distance between you and other drivers

Be safe out there!

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How To Get Your Lawn Ready For Fall

You keep up with it all summer long; the watering, the seeding, fertilizing, mowing, raking - it seems like a never ending chore that's thankless at its core. Maybe that's why at the first sign of colored leaves on the trees and falling temperatures, many quickly give up the task of lawn care.

And who could blame those who abandon lawn care right after Labor Day and the start of school; cutting the grass isn't really fun to begin with and those extra steps needed to ensure a green and lush lawn (fertilizer, thatching) are just more work than many care to put in.

But totally ignoring your lawn during the fall isn't the best choice of action - especially if you want a nice looking one come spring.

Thankfully, fall lawn care isn't all that much different from what you've been doing all summer long. Here are some good tips to get your lawn ready for to hibernate during winter and press back into shape once springtime rolls around.